Posts Tagged ‘filesharing’

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A quick round-up

August 8, 2009

Joel Tenenbaum

Still no internet at home, so instead of mainlining information, I’m getting methadone through my phone and the occasional infusion at Diesel. Back on a regular schedule shortly, but here’s some of what I’ve been squeezing through the needle:

In case you’ve missed it, Boston physics student Joel Tenenbaum (pictured above) is blogging his trial, defending himself against a $4.5 million lawsuit from the RIAA (parts one and two, at the Guardian Music Blog). Also, who gets the money the RIAA collects from filesharers? Not the indies.

Music Machinery had made me really excited about Spotify even before they had an iPhone app, so I’m latching onto rumours that they may be coming to the US.

On the agenda: checking out MTraks, which is billing itself as a indie-oriented eMusic alternative after the Sony debacle (and boy, the word on the transition was not good).

There’s a new website out of England called GigPay, for electronic performance contracts - the performer and the venue draw up a contract, the venue puts funds in escrow, and the performer is paid after the gig, and GigPay takes a small per-transaction cut. I’ve heard a bunch of horror stories from bands, and it seems like it would be a useful way for a venue to create, track and pay performance contracts (since you can do it by bank transfer or credit card, not just cash or cheque). But it also seems like there would be a big network effect hump to get over. Artists, others – what do you think?


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Economic effect of downloading a net win

January 23, 2009

graph

A new report, commissioned by the Ministry of Economic Affairs of the Netherlands, to look at the effects of downloading was just released (here; it’s in Dutch, of course). Some of the findings were not entirely unexpected – for example, 35% of the Dutch population has downloaded content (music, movies, games) without paying for it, but they pay for content as much as those that haven’t ‘freeloaded.’

But the most interesting point was the following (it’s quoted from Ars Technica, who posted about the report):

The study concludes that the effects are strongly positive because consumers get to enjoy desirable content and also get to keep their cash to buy other things. Because the consumers save much more money than the producers lose, the net economic effects are positive. The report also reinforces the truth that unpaid downloads do not translate into lost sales in anything close to a one-to-one ratio.

It’s refreshing to see downloading considered in the context of society as a whole, rather than just in terms of money lost by corporations.

If anyone reads Dutch, I’d be interested in the rest of the report. Feel free to e-mail me or to share in the comments.

[via Ars Technica]

MP3: MC Lars – Download This Song

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